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Recycling is a way to stop the waste, it makes sure that the products you throw will come back to life in another form. However, there is a way to recycle your everyday items by yourself, especially if you are a designer.

1. Vintage Tennis Rackets turned into Mirrors

The shape of a tennis racket looks like a mirror frame, so why not just take this literally and just create a mirror with your old tennis rackets?

5 cool ideas to give a new life to everyday items by repurposing them

2. The Bath Tub Couch

These old vintage bathtubs look great when used for their primary functionality already, but they even look better when repurposed into couches.

5 cool ideas to give a new life to everyday items by repurposing them

3. An Old Dresser turned into an Awesome Gardening Planter

Turning a furniture into a planter doesn’t only give it a new life, it makes grow new life.

5 cool ideas to give a new life to everyday items by repurposing them

4. The Beer Chandelier

Using the word chandelier usually connotates a classy item for lightening your interior, not exactly something you’d imagine to be built with old beer bottles. However, if you look at the image under, you can see that it can work pretty well.

5 cool ideas to give a new life to everyday items by repurposing them

5. The Bathroom Bike

A great way to decorated a bathroom, include your old bike into the interior design of the room.

5 cool ideas to give a new life to everyday items by repurposing them

As a conclusion, the examples shown here should be convincing enough for us to always try to find a clever and practical solution before throwing anything.

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An impressive cake designed with the help of algorithms

What happens when a talented designer, architect, and 3D artist combines her passion for baking cakes with her professional skills? The answer is in pictures in this post, with one of the latest creations by Dinara Kasko, a designer gone pastry artist.

Thanks to the power of the Internet, this Ukrainian housewife mashed up her passion with her professional background and now gives cake-creation workshops all around the world. See the video at the end of this post to see more about the making-off of this cake.

An impressive cake designed with the help of algorithms

An impressive cake designed with the help of algorithms

An impressive cake designed with the help of algorithms

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MAP Design Lab Creates MOVE Studio for Microsoft MR

Microsoft recently commissioned MAP Design Lab to create a kinetic experience as one of four featured demos showcasing the breadth of Windows Mixed Reality capabilities. Experienced through Microsoft partner headsets and operated using Microsoft controllers and the user's own changes in vertical and lateral movement, MOVE Studio lets users paint, dance, sway and bounce alongside professional Helios Dance Theater dancers and basketball players within specially-crafted artistic environments. All changes within the experience are determined by user movement.

According to its creator Melissa Painter, Founder/Creative Director at MAP Design Lab, the dance and basketball-based MR immersion was commissioned to draw in a greater audience of women, as well as users who may not be gaming aficionados. Pushing forward to create a future computing space that fosters creativity for its users, rather than a purely entertainment space, the experience broadens the inherent MR audience while redefining how users think about and use computers. This new relationship urges users to literally move.

MOVE Studio boasts two modes: "Play" and "Create." Within "Play," everything from sound design to visual effects are transformed based on the users' changing position. In "Create," the user enters a full-scope creators' sandbox for adults, where pairs of dancers or dribbling basketball players can be colored and scaled, then dropped into environments each with their own gravitational and medium characteristics. Both modes allow the user to shape his or her environment with no restrictions, empowering them to freely explore their digital space.

MOVE Studio 01MOVE Studio 02

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AMPL!FY: Advancing the Front Lines of Social Justice

AMPL!FY: Advancing the Front Lines of Social Justice, an exhibition of thought-provoking posters about current social justice issues, will be on view at the Museum of Arts and Design[1] (MAD) from November 2, 2017, to January 7, 2018.

The exhibition represents a partnership between MAD, Make Art with Purpose (MAP), Worldstudio, the New York City Department of Transportation's Art Program, and Harlem Stage. Spearheaded by artist Janeil Engelstad of MAP and designer Mark Randall of Worldstudio, this public art initiative leverages the power of art and design to amplify the issues addressed by non-profit organizations. To do this, Engelstad and Randall paired artists and designers with non-profits and asked them to create thought-provoking posters on themes relevant to each organization.

AMPL!FY: Advancing the Front Lines of Social JusticeAMPL!FY: Advancing the Front Lines of Social Justice

"These organizations often play a key role in protecting people's inherent dignity, helping the underserved to achieve their full potential and practice uninhibited expression of their rights," said Engelstad and Randall. "The work of these organizations is circuitous, challenging, and frequently lacks visibility. Typically, these organizations do not have the financial capacity to communicate their work beyond their core supporters."

AMPL!FY: Advancing the Front Lines of Social JusticeAMPL!FY: Advancing the Front Lines of Social JusticeAMPL!FY: Advancing the Front Lines of Social JusticeAMPL!FY: Advancing the Front Lines of Social Justice

AMPL!FY comprises ten posters, created by Morehshin Allahyari with CAIR-NY, the Council on American-Islamic Relations, New York; Gail Anderson and Joe Newton of AND with Made in Brownsville; Seymour Chwast with Vera Institute of Justice; DJ Spooky with 350.org; Rafael Esquer of Alfalfa Studio with Opening Act; Bobby Martin and Jennifer Kinon of OCD with the Lower Eastside Girls Club; Lissa Rivera with Hetrick-Martin Institute; Edel Rodriguez with the New Yorkers Against Gun Violence Education Fund; Dread Scott with Revolution Books; and Ryan Hartley Smith and Jerron Herman with Inclusive Collective.

References

  1. ^Museum of Arts and Design (www.dexigner.com)

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Thinking Machines: Art and Design in the Computer Age, 1959-1989

On view at the Museum of Modern Art from November 13, 2017, through April 8, 2018, Thinking Machines: Art and Design in the Computer Age, 1959-1989 brings artworks produced using computers and computational thinking together with notable examples of computer and component design.

The exhibition reveals how artists, architects, and designers operating at the vanguard of art and technology deployed computing as a means to reconsider artistic production.

Thinking Machines 06

The artists featured in this exhibition exploited the potential of emerging technologies by inventing systems wholesale or by partnering with institutions and corporations that provided access to cutting-edge machines. They channeled the promise of computing into kinetic sculpture, plotter drawing, computer animation, and video installation. Photographers and architects likewise recognized these technologies' capacity to reconfigure human communities and the built environment.

Thinking Machines 01Thinking Machines 02Thinking Machines 04

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